5 Steps to Move Your Company Toward Zero Landfill

Christine LellisCorporate Sustainability, Recycling Batteries

So your company decided to go ‘zero landfill’, and you aren’t sure what to do about it. What does ‘zero landfill’ actually mean? And where should you start?

Zero landfill, as the name suggests, aims to divert all solid waste from landfills. That means anything that would typically go in a garbage bin or dumpster must be reused, recycled, or eliminated entirely.

Zero landfill offers many advantages for organizations, including lower disposal costs and better brand image — but it can also pose a serious challenge at the ‘shop floor’ level.

Recycling your spent batteries with Battery Recyclers of America is just one way to reduce the amount of waste you send to landfill. Read on for more zero landfill tips:

1. Assess your primary sources of waste

Before you start thinking about ways to reduce waste, you need to know what your organization is currently sending to landfill. Take some time to observe the types, amounts, and sources of waste in your waste stream.

One eye-opening (and somewhat messy) way to do this is by dumpster diving: gathering a team to empty out a dumpster or trash can and analyze the contents.

Do you notice any patterns? Is there cardboard or paper that could potentially be recycled instead? What about organic waste that could be composted? These observations will give you clues to the best places to start your zero landfill journey.

2. Identify ways to generate less waste

The easiest way to send less waste to landfill? Reduce the amount of waste you generate in the first place. For example, simply managing your inventory more closely can help reduce redundant ordering and subsequent disposal. By only purchasing the necessary quantity of materials, you’ll not only reduce waste but also save your organization money.

3. Reuse materials when possible

Reusing materials is a great way to keep them out of landfills. It doesn’t cost you anything, and all it takes is a little creativity.

For example, instead of discarding shipping boxes, save them to ship items in later.  This is especially useful when you receive specialized parts that need to be returned to the manufacturer, since it will save you the hassle of trying to find a box that fits. You can also reuse cardboard, paper, and styrofoam as packing materials.

4. Turn trash into cash

You’ve probably heard the saying, “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.” At the end of their useful life, many commonly discarded items still have value when put to other uses.

Spent batteries, for example, can be recycled and the materials reused to produce new batteries and other products. Depending on the type and number of batteries you recycle, you may qualify to receive cash for your spent batteries!

Waste exchange programs, which are a bit like a matchmaking services for materials, are another option. Scrap metal, plastics, pallets, cardboard, and even specialty items like cores and spools can be sold to other companies through a waste exchange.

5. Use a ‘white glove’ recycling service like Battery Recyclers of America

Recycling can help you move toward zero landfill, but finding solutions for all your recyclables can be a time consuming process. The easiest option is to work with a recycling service that handles the entire process for you.

Battery Recyclers of America provides next day pickup of every battery type, no matter where you are or how many you have. Our custom services are designed to have us handle all the hard work, so that you can get back to doing what you do best.

Could you use some help achieving zero landfill? Email our team or give us a call at (800-508-6670) to speak with one of our battery recycling experts today for more information!